Hospice and Palliative Care Awareness

Savor Health would like to recognize National Hospice and Palliative Care month.  Thanks to hospice and palliative care, many patients and families are able to focus on living and improve their quality of life at a time when this is so important.

 

Early Access and Communication

Early access to hospice care is important because it can help to reduce visits to the emergency room and hospitalization as well as improve quality of life for both patients and their caregivers.  According to the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization (NHPCO), 8 out of 10 Americans prefer to be at home at the end of life.

Communication is an important part of expediting appropriate hospice and palliative care interventions.  As there is often a misconception that hospice care is equivalent to “giving up”, organizations such as NHPCO and the National Hospice Association strive to promote the benefits and expertise of interdisciplinary hospice and palliative care teams trained in this discipline whose focus is on caring rather than curing.

 

According to the NHPCO, these are six important points to remember about hospice:

  1. Hospice care is usually provided in the home; wherever the patient calls home
  2. Hospice cares for people with any kind of life-limiting illness
  3. Hospice is fully covered by Medicare, Medicaid and most private health insurances
  4. Hospice is not limited to 6 months of care
  5. Hospice is not “giving up,” rather it focuses on caring, not curing
  6. Anyone can contact hospice; call your local program any time.

 

For more information, please visit the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization and the Hospice Foundation of America.

You can also find more information about hospice and advanced care planning at the NHPCO Caring Connections, caringinfo.org or HelpLine 800-658-8898.

 

 

Jessica Iannotta, MS, RD, CSO, CDN

Jessica is a registered dietitian and certified specialist in oncology nutrition (CSO). She studied nutrition at Cornell University and completed her dietetic internship at New York Presbyterian Weill Cornell Medical Center. She obtained her Master's degree through the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. Jessica has worked in inpatient and outpatient oncology settings since 2001 in the North Shore-LIJ Health System. Jessica is in charge of all operations including clinical and culinary operations ranging from menu development to evidence-based website content, relationships with registered dietitians and social workers and developing processes and protocols for intake, management and outcomes analysis of patients.

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