Blueberry Super Greens Smoothie

Blueberries are a true super food. These tiny, round berries are native to North America and have long been attributed to longevity and wellness. Naturally sweet and juicy, they are low in sugar, high in fiber, and packed with nutrients – they are truly one of the best food choices that you can eat!

 

Blueberries for Health

Their vibrant color indicates that they are full of antioxidants, including flavonoids and other phytochemicals. In fact, blueberries actually contain one of the highest antioxidant loads of any food on the planet!  This plethora of antioxidants is beneficial because these special compounds appear to confer both cardio-protective and anti-cancer effects in the body. They have been linked to reducing inflammation, preventing DNA damage, inhibiting tumor angiogenesis, and reducing blood pressure.  Consumption of berries has also been shown to reduce the risk of diabetes, some cancers, and even cognitive decline.  Berries are thought to be excellent for the brain – improving both motor skills and coordination as well as memory [i][ii][iii][iv][v][vi][vii][viii].

For a powerful health boost in the morning, try starting your day with a delicious green smoothie, featuring blueberries!  The combination of blueberries and leafy greens from the kale and spinach in the recipe below, is believed to act synergistically, potentially activating repair mechanisms in the body that may serve to protect our cells against damage from the onslaught of toxins that we face everyday. Cheers to that!

Super Greens Smoothie
Serves 2
Ingredients
  1. 3 oz. raw spinach
  2. 2 oz. raw kale
  3. 1 frozen banana
  4. 1 cup blueberries (can be raw or frozen)
  5. ½ cup unsweetened almond milk
  6. ½ cup pomegranate juice
  7. 1 tablespoon flax seeds
  8. 1 teaspoon chia seeds
Add ingredients to shopping list
If you don’t have Buy Me a Pie! app installed you’ll see the list with ingredients right after downloading it
Instructions
  1. Blend all ingredients in a high-powered blender until smooth and creamy. Enjoy!
Print
Adapted from Eat to Live by Dr. Joel Furhman
Savor Health http://savorhealth.com/
References
[i] Bazzano LA, Li TY, Joshipura KJ, et al. Intake of Fruit, Vegetables, and Fruit Juices and Risk of Diabetes in Women. Diabetes Care 2008;31:1311-1317.
[ii] Cassidy A, O’Reilly EJ, Kay C, et al. Habitual intake of flavonoid subclasses and incident hypertension in adults. The American journal of clinical nutrition 2011;93:338-347.
[iii] Hannum SM. Potential impact of strawberries on human health: a review of the science. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr 2004;44:1-17.
[iv] Joseph JA, Shukitt-Hale B, Willis LM. Grape juice, berries, and walnuts affect brain aging and behavior. J Nutr 2009;139:1813S-1817S.
[v] Roy S, Khanna S, Alessio HM, et al. Anti-angiogenic property of edible berries. Free Radic Res 2002;36:1023-1031.
[vi] Stoner GD, Wang LS, Casto BC. Laboratory and clinical studies of cancer chemoprevention by antioxidants in berries. Carcinogenesis 2008;29:1665-1674.
[vii] Bickford PC, Shukitt-Hale B, Joseph J. Effects of aging on cerebellar noradrenergic function and motor learning: nutritional interventions. Mech Ageing Dev 1999;111:141-154.
[viii] Krikorian R, Shidler MD, Nash TA, et al. Blueberry supplementation improves memory in older adults. J Agric Food Chem 2010;58:3996-4000.
1 Comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>